Fate and Friendship Exhibition Opening

Museum Tribute to Honor Dr. Bill Birdwell
January 8, 2013
4th Annual Downtown Love Run in February
January 14, 2013

The J. Wayne Stark Galleries will be hosting a free painting exhibition, gallery talk and reception. Hansegger and Delulio Fate and Friendship will go on display in the newly remodeled J. Wayne Stark Galleries of Texas A&M University in the Memorial Student Center, opening Thursday, January 24, and closing Thursday, March 13. John and his wife, Cindy Delulio, will provide a Gallery Talk to visitors on Thursday, January 24, at 5:30 in the evening, followed by a reception.

Fate and Friendship

An Extraordinary Exhibit Displaying the Paybacks of Mentoring
Mentoring in the arts is a chief factor in the career of artists. The famous ones have always had living influences on their work.

The J. Wayne Stark Galleries will be hosting a free painting exhibition, gallery talk and reception. Hansegger and Delulio Fate and Friendship will go on display in the newly remodeled J. Wayne Stark Galleries of Texas A&M University in the Memorial Student Center, opening Thursday, January 24, and closing Thursday, March 13. John and his wife, Cindy Delulio, will provide a Gallery Talk to visitors on Thursday, January 24, at 5:30 in the evening, followed by a reception.

Fate and Friendship

An Extraordinary Exhibit Displaying the Paybacks of Mentoring
Mentoring in the arts is a chief factor in the career of artists. The famous ones have always had living influences on their work. The artist John Delulio, protégé of mentor John Hansegger, reaped the benefits of Hansegger’s support, skills, wisdom, and coaching in midlife. In their case, mentoring developed into a profound friendship.

Swiss-born Hansegger (1908 – 89) was a distinctive figure in 20th century art, working in and creating many of the major movements of the century.  His career spanned seven decades and five continents. Hansegger’s first success was in Switzerland with a one-man show in 1928 where the local press noted, “the extraordinary exactitude of the paintings and the creative power of this young artist are remarkable.” In the 1930’s Hansegger met Picasso in Paris.  Picasso took him under his wing and even sat for a rare portrait. As a young artist Hansegger painted the street and gardens of Paris and was discovered by Fernand Leger who took interest in him so much so it led to an exhibit.  Leger made Hansegger share his winnings with other students, saying artists should support and mentor each other.  Hansegger never forgot, and later mentored Paul Klee and Piet Mondrian, famous abstractionists.

After WWII, the restless Hansegger began touring the world, Japan, Sweden, Israel, Africa, Ecuador, and America, in need of adventure, and spiritual and fiscal revival.  Hansegger always searched for artistic freedom, moving between styles.  He painted for the joy of it while portraits sustained his career – they included Picasso, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Nelson Rockefeller, D.T. Suzuki, Arturo Toscanini, and many others.

Abstract Art, Art Concrete, and Surrealism always interested him.  When he felt inhibited by these movements he created new ones: Parallelism, the unique style called Vertical/Horizontal, Erraticism, Ornamentalism, and Abstract Landscape.  Hansegger moved to America permanently in 1953.

Delulio and Hansegger lived in the beautiful Berkshires of Massachusetts.  Delulio had been a commercial artist in New York City and Chicago, but the lure of the countryside was too much for him to resist.  The bond began in 1974 when Delulio asked Hansegger if he would like to see his art gallery.  The master artist noticed the younger artist’s triangle series, Delulio’s new form of art.  “Let me see them;  you have something very unique here.”  Their relationship developed into an exceptional camaraderie.

Delulio says, “Hans not only was a mentor and patron, but a great friend, father-figure, and fellow artist.  Every artist needs a Hansegger; my life is complete now that I met my champion.”  When Delulio exhibited his paintings, Hans, an experienced art dealer, elaborated on the significance of the triangle and its historic and religious influence to patrons.

John Keeler, an admired writer and critic on art music and theatre in New York’s Hudson Valley, says, “Never before had an artist taken the triangle as a basic motif for his art… .  Delulio did on canvas what the great composers do in reaching infinity in a few upward measures.  I wound up wondering if Delulio could be the first ‘SPACIEST'”?

Although the Delulios moved to Houston in 1977, the protégé/mentor relationship remained binding.  The two corresponded for years, each inspiring the other, until the master was laid to rest in 1989.  Delulio continues his commercial and fine art from his country place in the Brazos Valley where he lives with his wife Cindy, a former marketing communications and public relations manager for Halliburton and Bechtel.  They are retired now, but they still remember the days of the textbook friendship that only happened because of fate.

Nearly 60 paintings will be on display at the Stark Galleries, by both Hansegger and Delulio.  The gallery is open weekdays Tuesday through Friday, 9am to 8pm, and Saturday and Sunday 12 noon to 6pm. Parking is located across the street from the Memorial Student Center on Houston Street.

To learn more about the J. Wayne Stark Galleries, please visit http://uart.tamu.edu or call 979-845-6081.